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Fig. E.5 Geometry of the reflection effect 1. The basic geometry

Fig. E.5 Geometry of the reflection effect 1. The basic geometry rj = (xj, yj, zj) ^ (o, Oj ,<pj), j = 1, 2

be the coordinates with the origin in the center of component j. The coordinate systems can be transformed into each other by

Spherical coordinate systems, C1 and C2, introduced in Sect. 3.1.1, also are used. All quantities indexed by * refer to the coordinate system with center in the origin of the irradiating star. If two signs are given, as in (E.29.3), the upper one refers to the case that the primary component is the irradiated star. The coordinates x, y, and z always refer to the irradiated component:

X1 = j 0} ± x, y1 =±y, Z1 = z, x+= X1 -j ^J . (E.29.3)

According to Fig. E.5 the distance from a point of the irradiated star to the center of the irradiating star is given by d = \/x2 + y2 + z2v dxy = y x+2 + yi2.

The transformation r = (r, 0, ^ (r+, 0*, = (d, 0*, ) is, as shown in Fig. E.6, realized by

Fig. E.6 Geometry of the reflection effect 2. The by * refer to the coordinate system with center in simplicity, the figure shows circles it should not modeled as a sphere, which is not the case
relevant angles are shown. Quantities indexed the origin of the irradiating star. Although, for give the impression that the irradiated star is
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