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Fig. 3.18 Light variation caused purely by the reflection effect. The figure shows the B light curve of V664 Cassiopeiae, the close binary nucleus located in the planetary nebulae HFG 1. Data, courtesy Howard E. Bond

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In a quantitative picture, let subscript t refer to that star for which the reflection heating is to be investigated (the target or irradiated star). The index s refers to the irradiating source star. In an Algol-type system the irradiating star would be the smaller, hotter, "primary" component; this hotter component is our initial source star s. In the same Algol system, the irradiated star would be a yellow subgiant or giant. Here it is our initial target star, t. In Wilson-Devinney argot, these are stars 1 and 2, respectively.

Let Tl denote the local temperature at a surface point, rl, of the target star, computed according to (3.2.13). A conventional approach in light curve reflection modeling is to compute, for each surface element, the ratio of the integrated bolometric irradiance flux Fs (i.e., incident flux) (coming from our source star s) to the local "undisturbed" bolometric flux, Ft, and to derive a modified effective temperature T{ according to

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