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Nadon, G. C. 1993. The association of anastomosed fluvial deposits and dinosaur tracks, eggs, and nests: implications for the interpretation of floodplain environments and a possible survival strategy for ornithopods. Palaios 8: 31-44.

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You visit the, gift-shop of your local natural history museum and, as you reach into a bin of plastic models of dinosaurs, pterosaurs, and mammoths, your hand encounters an upraised ridge on one model. You see that it is Stegosaurus and the "ridge" is actually a row of plates on its dorsal surface. While you are waiting at the checkout counter, you notice a poster that depicts a stegosaur in life, with its plates overlapping and arranged in two rows. You look at the model in your hand and see that it only has a single row of plates that do not overlap.

Which restoration is most likely, based on the available evidence? What was the function of the plates? How could the arrangement of the plates have an impact on interpretations about their function?

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