LE Representative genera of Ceratosauria with approximate geologic age and location

Genus

Age

Geographic Location

Abelisaurus

Late Cretaceous

Argentina

Aucasaurus

Late Cretaceous

Argentina

Carnotaurus

Early Cretaceous

Argentina

Ceratosaurus

Late Jurassic

Western US; Tanzania

Coelophysis

Late Triassic

Western US

Dilophosaurus

Early Jurassic

Western US; China

Elaphrosaurus

Early Cretaceous

Tanzania

Genusaurus

Early Cretaceous

France

Indosaurus

Late Cretaceous

India

Indosuchus

Late Cretaceous

India

Liliensternus

Late Triassic

Germany; France

Majungasaurus

Late Cretaceous

Madagascar

Majungatholus

Late Cretaceous

Madagascar

Masiakasaurus

Late Cretaceous

Madagascar

Noasaurus

Late Cretaceous

Argentina

Podokesaurus

Early Jurassic

Eastern US

Procompsognathus

Late Triassic

Germany

Syntarsus

Early Jurassic

Zimbabwe; South Africa; western US

Xenotarsosaurus

Late Cretaceous

Argentina

on the basis of only one or two specimens. Additionally, some of these specimens are incomplete or otherwise have scrappy remains. For example, Dilophosaurus is the most famous of ceratosaurs because of its starring role in the 1993 film Jurassic Park. Unlike most other dinosaurs in this movie, it also actually lived during the Jurassic Period. Nevertheless, Dilophosaurus is only known on the basis of seven specimens, all from Arizona.

Part of this neglect for all things ceratosaurian may be related to the preponderance of dinosaur paleontologists who have chosen to work exclusively on tetanurans. However, it also may be a factor of geology and geography. Most specimens of ceratosaurs are in Triassic and Jurassic strata, meaning that taphonomic processes had more time to erase their remains than later theropod lineages (Chapter 7). In terms of possible geographic bias, only a few ceratosaur species have been found so far in the USA and Europe, whereas most occur in former areas of Gondwana and in Cretaceous strata. Geologic uncertainty of preservation combined with geographic distance can create discouraging conditions for paleontologists interested in studying ceratosaurs. Regardless of the reasons for their relative neglect, more work is needed in studying ceratosaurs, especially in terms of determining their relationships to basal theropods and Tetanurae.

Of all dinosaur groups, none have been studied and debated as vociferously as Tetanurae (= "stiff tail").

0 0

Responses

  • christopher
    What is the geographic location of the genusaurus?
    4 months ago

Post a comment