Compsognathus

The only dinosaur discovered at Solnhofen is Compsognathus. This tiny carnivore—one of the smallest of all dinosaurs—may have hunted for little reptiles and insects. As a dinosaur, it can only have lived on land, so how did it end up in the water of Solnhofen? Perhaps a river carried its dead body from the land to the lagoon, where it sank and became a fossil.

__ Birdlike fEET had three clawed toes facing forward

DID YOU KNOW?

Solnhofen's limestone has preserved the remains of more than 500 different Jurassic animal species, giving us a glimpse of life above and below water level. There are fossils of fish, turtles, starfish, jellyfish, ammonites, and worms, together with creatures of the sky and land that somehow ended up in the water.

Midway position—

the wings are partly folded and raised using a different set of muscles

Midway position—

the wings are partly folded and raised using a different set of muscles

Upstroke position—the wings are fully raised, ready for the next power stroke

■ Downstroke position—the main flight stroke is made by a powerful thrust of the wings down and backward

Upstroke position—the wings are fully raised, ready for the next power stroke

, PTERODACTYLUS

About 100 Pterodactylus specimens have been found at Solnhofen. While dinosaurs ruled the land, these flying reptiles controlled the skies, and the small, fish-eating Pterodactylus was a common sight. It's lightly built skeletal framework suggests that it was a powerful flyer.

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