About the authors

Thomas N. Taylor is a distinguished Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and Curator of Paleobotany in the Natural History Museum and Biodiversity Research Center at the University of Kansas. He also holds a courtesy appointment in the Department of Geology. He received his Ph.D. in botany from the University of Illinois, and was a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow at Yale University. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. His research interests include Permian and Triassic biotas of Antarctica, early land plant-fungal interactions, the origin and evolution of reproductive systems in early land plants, symbiotic systems through time, and the biology and evolution of fossil microbes.

Edith L. Taylor has been a Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Senior Curator of Paleobotany in the Natural History Museum and Biodiversity Research Center at the University of Kansas since 1995, and also serves as a Courtesy Professor of Geology. She received her Ph.D. in paleobotany from the Ohio State University, where she was an American Association of University Women Dissertation Fellow. She is the author of seven books or edited volumes, and more than 140 publications. She was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1992. Her research interests include fossil wood growth and paleoclimate, Permian and Triassic permineralized plants from Antarctica, distribution and diversity of Permian-Triassic Antarctic floras, and the structure and evolution of fossil phloem.

Michael Krings Geology

Michael Krings is Curator for Fossil Plants in the Bavarian State Collection for Palaeontology and Geology (BSPG) at Munich, Germany, and Professor of Plant Paleobiology at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit√§t, Munich. He also holds an affiliate faculty position in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Kansas. He received his Ph.D. in botany from the University of M√ľnster, Germany, and was an Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Kansas. His research interests include Carboniferous, Permian, and Triassic seed plants from Europe and North America, and the biology and ecology of microorganisms in late Paleozoic terrestrial ecosystems.

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The Earth is a vast cemetery where the rocks are tombstones on which the buried dead have written their own epitaphs.

Louis Agassiz

... intoxicated joy and amazement at the beauty and grandeur of this world, of which man can just form a faint notion.

Albert Einstein

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