Basic Atmospheric Data

The Dutch American astronomer Gerard P. Kuiper ascertained from telescopic observations in 1947 that the Martian atmosphere is composed mainly of carbon dioxide. The atmosphere is very thin, exerting less than 1 percent of Earth's atmospheric pressure at the surface. Surface pressures range over a factor of 15 because of the large altitude variations in Mars's topography. Only small amounts of water are present in the atmosphere today. If it all precipitated out, it would form a layer of ice crystals only 10 micrometres (0.0004 inch) thick, which could be gathered into a solid block of ice not much larger than a medium-sized terrestrial iceberg. Despite the small amount of water present, the atmosphere is near saturation, and water-ice clouds are common.

Low-lying clouds and fogs are often observed within topographic depressions—i.e., valleys or craters. Thin clouds are common at the morning terminator (the dividing line between the lit and unlit portions of the planet's disk), and orographic clouds, produced when moist air is lifted over elevated terrain and cooled, form around prominent topographic features such as craters and volcanoes. In winter, westward-moving spiral-shaped storm systems, similar to those on Earth, are seen regularly at midlatitudes. Most of these clouds—in particular, the white clouds seen by the early observers—are composed of water ice.

Dust storms are common on Mars. They can occur at any time but are most frequent in southern spring and summer, when Mars is passing closest to the Sun and surface temperatures are at their highest. Most of the storms are regional in extent and last a few weeks. Every second or third year, however, the dust storms become global. At their peak, dust is carried so high in the atmosphere that only the summits of the loftiest volcanoes—up to 21 km (13 miles) above the planet's mean radius—are visible.

Although too small to be observed from Earth, dust devils have been seen from Mars orbit and at the various spacecraft landing sites. Narrow tracks, thought to be caused by dust devils, are also visible in high-resolution images taken from orbit.

The characteristic temperature in the lower atmosphere is about 200 K (-70 °C, or -100 °F), which is generally colder than the average daytime surface temperature of 250 K (20 °C, or -10 °F). These values are in the same range as those experienced on Earth in Antarctica during winter. In summer above a very dark surface, daytime temperatures can peak at about 290 K (17 °C, or 62 °F). Above the turbulent layer close to the surface, temperature decreases with elevation at a rate of about 1.5 K (-270 °C, or -460 °F) per km (about 2.4 K [-270 °C, or -455 °F] per mile) of altitude.

Unlike that of Earth, the atmosphere of Mars experiences large seasonal variations in pressure as carbon dioxide, the main constituent, "snows out" at the winter pole and returns directly to a gas (sublimes) in the spring. Because the southern winter cap is more extensive than the northern, atmospheric pressure reaches a minimum during southern winter when the southern cap is at its largest. The pressure varies annually by 26 percent as some 7.9 trillion metric tons of carbon dioxide leave and reenter the atmosphere seasonally. This is equivalent to a thickness of at least 23 cm (9 inches) of solid carbon dioxide (dry ice) or several metres of carbon dioxide snow averaged over the vast area of the seasonal polar caps.

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