Surface Features

The dark markings cover about one-third of the Martian surface, mostly in a band around the planet between latitudes 10° and 40° S. Their distribution is irregular, and their gross pattern has been observed to change over timescales of tens to hundreds of years. The northern hemisphere has only three such major features— Acidalia Planitia, Syrtis Major, and a dark collar around the pole—which were once considered to be shallow seas or vegetated regions. It is now known that many of Mars's dark areas form and change as winds move dark sand around the surface or sweep areas free of bright dust. Many of the bright areas are regions of dust accumulation. The canals that figured so prominently on maps made from telescopic observations around the turn of the 20th century are not visible in close-up spacecraft images. They were almost certainly imaginary features that observers thought they saw while straining to make out objects close to the limit of resolution of their telescopes. Other features, such as the "wave of darkening" and the "blue haze" described by early observers at the telescope, are now known to result from a combination of the viewing conditions and changes in the reflective properties of the surface.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Telescopes Mastery

Telescopes Mastery

Through this ebook, you are going to learn what you will need to know all about the telescopes that can provide a fun and rewarding hobby for you and your family!

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment