THE HyDrosphere

Earth's hydrosphere is a discontinuous layer of water at or near the planet's surface; it includes all liquid and frozen surface waters, groundwater held in soil and rock, and atmospheric water vapour. Unique within the solar system, the hydrosphere is essential to all life as it is presently understood. Almost 71 percent of Earth's surface is covered by saltwater oceans, with a volume of about 1.4 billion cubic km (336 million cubic miles) and an average temperature of about 4 °C (39.2 °F), not far above the freezing point of water.

The oceans contain about 97 percent of the planet's water volume. The remainder occurs as freshwater, three-quarters of which is locked up in the form of ice at polar latitudes. Most of the remaining freshwater is groundwater held in soils and rocks; less than 1 percent of it occurs in lakes and rivers. In terms of percentage, atmospheric water vapour is negligible, but the transport of water evaporated from the oceans onto land surfaces is an integral part of the hydrologic cycle that renews and sustains life.

The hydrologic cycle involves the transfer of water from the oceans through the atmosphere to the continents and back to the oceans over and beneath the land surface. The cycle includes processes such as precipitation, evaporation, transpiration, infiltration, percolation, and runoff. These processes operate throughout the entire hydrosphere, which extends from about 15 km (9 miles) into the atmosphere to roughly 5 km (3 miles) into the crust.

About one-third of the solar energy that reaches Earth's surface is expended on evaporating ocean water. The resulting atmospheric moisture and humidity condense into clouds, rain, snow, and dew. Moisture is a crucial factor in determining weather. It is the driving force behind storms and is responsible for separating electrical charge, which is the cause of lightning and thus of natural wildland fires, which have an important role in some ecosystems. Moisture wets the land, replenishes subterranean aquifers, chemically weathers the rocks, erodes the landscape, nourishes life, and fills the rivers, which carry dissolved chemicals and sediments back into the oceans.

Water also plays a vital role in the carbon dioxide cycle (a part of the more inclusive carbon cycle). Under the action of water and dissolved carbon dioxide, calcium is weathered from continental rocks and carried to the oceans, where it combines to form calcium carbonates (including shells of marine life). Eventually the carbonates are deposited on the seafloor and are lithified to form limestones. Some of these carbonate rocks are later dragged deep into Earth's interior by the global process of plate tectonics and melted, resulting in a rerelease of carbon dioxide (from volcanoes, for example) into the atmosphere. Cyclic processing of water, carbon dioxide, and oxygen through geologic and biological systems on Earth has been fundamental to maintaining the habitability of the planet with time and to shaping the erosion and weathering of the continents.

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