Statistical Analysis

We compared the mean percentage of survivorship at the end of the period between Pinus canariensis protected and unprotected from grazing in the five plots and P. canariensis and P. pinea mean percentage of survivorship with a random pair t-test (p > 0.05, n=5, 1000 iterations; Edgington 1985). Non-normal errors made this test suitable.

Table 1. General abiotic information of the plots

Size

Slope

Altitude

Cover class *

Shrub

Canopy

m2

Sexagesimal °

m

Rock

Soil

litter

cover class *

cover(%)

plot 1

1600

7

1205

4

3

9

6

41

plot 2

1500

21

1200

3

4

9

7

40

plot 3

1500

12

1250

5

3

9

8

60

plot 4

2000

25

1230

5

4

9

8

50

plot 5

2500

21

1140

5

6

8

7

42

(*) Cover of the different parameters estimate visually in the total plot with the following cover classes: cover classes: 1: traces, 2: <1% of cover in the plot, 3: 1-2%, 4: 2-5%, 5: 5-10%, 6: 10-25%, 7: 2550%, 8: 50-75%, 9: >75%, 10: 100%.

(*) Cover of the different parameters estimate visually in the total plot with the following cover classes: cover classes: 1: traces, 2: <1% of cover in the plot, 3: 1-2%, 4: 2-5%, 5: 5-10%, 6: 10-25%, 7: 2550%, 8: 50-75%, 9: >75%, 10: 100%.

The percentages of basal area and density of trees of each species (Pinus canariensis and P. pinea) were compared with the percentage of regeneration of the same species in each plot using the non-parametric Spearman Rank correlation coefficient and tested for significance (p< 0.05). Basic statistical methods followed Zar (1984) and were implemented using the SPSS statistical package (SPSS 1986).

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