Preceeding

Fig. 4.9. Jupiter's Long-Lived South Temperate White Ovals in False Color. Anticyclonic (counterclockwise) ovals BE and FA as imaged by the Galileo spacecraft. Note the cyclonic (clockwise) intervening balloon shaped vortex between them. When this smaller oval disappeared the two larger ones merged. In this false-color image, light blue clouds are high and thin, reddish clouds are deep, and white clouds are high and thick. The clouds and haze over the large white ovals BE and FA are high, extending into Jupiter's stratosphere. North is at the top. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech).

Fig. 4.10. South Temperate Oval BA in Conjunction with the Great Red Spot. The Great Red Spot on July 15, 2006 with a dark center. Note the collar of gray material bordering the GRs on its southern edge. South Temperate Oval BA, just to the south, has also taken on a reddish color, very similar in intensity to the GRS. (Credit: Courtesy Donald C. Parker).

Fig. 4.10. South Temperate Oval BA in Conjunction with the Great Red Spot. The Great Red Spot on July 15, 2006 with a dark center. Note the collar of gray material bordering the GRs on its southern edge. South Temperate Oval BA, just to the south, has also taken on a reddish color, very similar in intensity to the GRS. (Credit: Courtesy Donald C. Parker).

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