Later observations from earth

Earth-based observations of Neptune before Voyager 2's flyby suffered greatly as a consequence of the planet's enormous distance from both Earth and the Sun. Its average orbital radius of 30.1 AU means that the sunlight reaching its moons and its upper atmosphere is barely 0.1 percent as bright as that at Earth. Pre-Voyager telescopic viewing of Neptune through the full thickness of Earth's atmosphere could not resolve features smaller than about one-tenth of Neptune's diameter, even under the best observing conditions. Most such observations concentrated on determining Neptune's size, mass, density, and orbital parameters and searching for moons. In the early 21st century specialized inter-ferometric techniques have routinely improved spatial resolution of distant objects by factors of 10-100 over earlier surface-based observations.

From time to time astronomers reported seeing visual markings in the Neptunian atmosphere, but not until the use of high-resolution infrared chargecoupled device (CCD) cameras in the 1980s could such observations be repeated with enough consistency to permit determination of an approximate rotation period for Neptune. Spectroscopic observations from Earth revealed the presence of hydrogen and methane in the planet's atmosphere. By analogy with the other giant planets, helium was also expected to be present. Infrared and visual studies revealed that Neptune has an internal heat source.

By the mid-1990s the fully operational Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was enabling images and other data concerning Neptune to be collected outside the filtering and distorting effects of Earth's atmosphere. The orbiting infrared Spitzer Space Telescope also succeeded in imaging Neptune with a resolution much higher than those available from Earth's surface in the 1980s. In addition, astronomers have developed techniques for minimizing the effects of atmospheric distortion from Earth-based observation. The most successful of these, known as adaptive optics, continually processes information from infrared star images and applies it nearly instantaneously to correct the shape of the telescope mirror and thereby compensate for the distortion. As a consequence, large Earth-based telescopes now routinely achieve resolutions better than those of the HST. Images of Neptune obtained with adaptive optics allow studies of this distant planet at resolutions approaching those from the Voyager 2 encounter.

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