Measuring Asteroids

The first measurements of the sizes of individual asteroids were made in the last years of the 19th century. A filar micrometer, an instrument normally used in conjunction with a telescope for visual measurement of the separations of double stars, was employed to estimate the diameters of the first four known asteroids. The results established that Ceres was the largest asteroid, having a diameter estimated to be nearly 800 km (497 miles). These values had remained the best available until new techniques for finding albedos (reflectivities) and diameters, based on infrared radiometry and polarization measurements, were introduced beginning about 1970. The first four asteroids came to be known as the "big four," and, because all other asteroids were much fainter, they all were believed to be considerably smaller as well.

The first asteroid to have its mass determined was Vesta—in 1966 from measurements of its perturbation of the orbit of asteroid (197) Arete. The first mineralogical determination of the surface composition of an asteroid was made in 1969 when spectral reflectance measurements identified the mineral pyroxene in the surface material of Vesta.

Size and Albedo

About 30 asteroids are larger than 200 km (124 miles). The largest, Ceres, has a diameter of about 940 km (584 miles). It is followed by Pallas at 530 km (329 miles), Vesta at 520 km (323 miles), and (10) Hygiea at 410 km (255 miles). Three asteroids are between 300 and 400 km (186 and 249 miles) in diameter, and about 23 between 200 and 300 km (124 and 186 miles). It has been estimated that 250 asteroids are larger than 100 km (62 miles) in diameter and perhaps a million are larger than 1 km (0.6 miles). The smallest known asteroids are members of the near-Earth group, some of which approach Earth to within a few hundredths of 1 AU. The smallest routinely observed Earth-approaching asteroids measure about 100 metres (328 feet) across.

The most widely used technique for determining the sizes of asteroids (and other small bodies in the solar system) is that of thermal radiometry. This technique exploits the fact that the infrared radiation (heat) emitted by an asteroid must balance the solar radiation it absorbs. By using a so-called thermal model to balance the measured intensity of infrared radiation with that of radiation at visual wavelengths, investigators are able to derive the diameter of the asteroid. Other remote-sensing techniques—for example, polarimetry, radar, and adaptive optics (techniques for minimizing the distorting effects of Earth's atmosphere)—also are used, but they are limited to brighter, larger, or closer asteroids.

The only techniques that measure the diameter directly (i.e., without having to model the actual observations) are those of stellar occultation and direct imaging using either advanced instruments on Earth (e.g., large telescopes equipped with adaptive optics or orbiting observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope) or passing spacecraft. In the method of stellar occultation, investigators measure the length of time that a star disappears from view owing to the passage of an asteroid between the star and Earth. Then, using the known distance and the rate of motion of the asteroid, they are able to determine the latter's diameter as projected onto the plane of the sky.

The necessary techniques for imaging asteroids directly were perfected during the last years of the 20th century. They (and radar) can be used to observe an asteroid over a complete rotation cycle and so measure the three-dimensional shape. These results have made it possible to calibrate the indirect techniques, thermal radiometry in particular, such that diameter measurements made with thermal radiometry on asteroids larger than about 20 km (12 miles) are thought to be uncertain by less than 10 percent; for smaller asteroids the uncertainty is about 30 percent.

The occultation technique is limited to the rare passages of asteroids in front of stars, and, because the technique measures only one cross section, it is best applied to fairly spherical asteroids. On the other hand, direct imaging (at least to date) has been limited to the nearer, brighter, or larger asteroids. Consequently, the majority of asteroid sizes have been and will probably continue to be obtained with indirect techniques. Direct imaging has allowed the accurate determination of the diameters of about two dozen asteroids, including Ceres, Pallas, Juno, and Vesta, compared with 2,300 measured with indirect techniques, principally thermal radiometry.

A property that is closely related to size (and that also provides compositional information) is albedo. Albedo is the ratio between the amount of light actually reflected and that which would be reflected by a uniformly scattering disk of the same size, both observed at opposition. Snow has an albedo of approximately 1 and coal an albedo of about 0.05.

An asteroid's apparent brightness depends on both its albedo and diameter as well as on its distance. For example, if Ceres and Vesta could both be observed at the same distance, Vesta would be the brighter of the two by about 15 percent, even though Vesta's diameter is only a little more than half that of Ceres. Vesta would appear brighter because its albedo is about 0.40, compared with 0.10 for Ceres.

Asteroid albedos range from about 0.02 to more than 0.5 and may be divided into four groups: low (0.02-0.07), intermediate (0.08-0.12), moderate (0.13-0.28), and high (greater than 0.28). After corrections are added for the fact that the brighter and nearer asteroids are favoured for discovery, about 78 percent of known asteroids larger than about 25 km (15 miles) in diameter are found to be low-albedo objects. Most of these are located in the outer half of the main asteroid belt and among the outer-belt populations. More than 95 percent of outer-belt asteroids belong to this group. Roughly 18 percent of known asteroids belong to the moderate-albedo group, the vast majority of which are found in the inner half of the main belt. The intermediate- and high-albedo asteroid groups make up the remaining 4 percent of the population. For the most part, they occupy the same part of the main belt as the moderate-albedo objects.

The albedo distribution for asteroids with diameters less than 25 km (15 miles) is poorly known because only a small fraction of this population has been characterized. However, if these objects are mostly fragments from a few asteroid families, then their albedo distribution may differ significantly from that of their larger siblings.

0 0

Post a comment