The Ages of Meteorites and Their Components

When the planets and asteroids formed, they contained a number of different radio-nuclides, which are radioactive isotopes that decay at characteristic rates. The time it takes for half of the atoms of a quantity of of a radionuclide to decay, the half-life, is a common way of representing its decay rate. Many radionuclides have half-lives that are similar to or longer than the age of the solar system; for this reason they are often called long-lived radionuclides. As a result of their longevity, they are still present in meteorites and on Earth, and they are commonly used for dating rocks and meteorites.

Scientists typically determine the age of a rock or meteorite using the isochron method. For purposes of illustration, consider the rubidium-strontium decay system. In this system, the radioactive parent rubidium-87 (87Rb) decays to the stable daughter isotope strontium-87 (87Sr). The half-life for 87Rb decay is 48.8 billion years. Strontium has a number of other stable isotopes, including strontium-86 (86Sr), which is often used as a reference. When a rock forms, the minerals within it have identical strontium isotopic compositions (e.g., 87Sr/86Sr ratios) but often have different rubidium/strontium ratios (e.g., 87Rb/86Sr ratios). In this case, as 87Rb decays, the 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the minerals all increase with time but at different rates—the 87Sr/86Sr ratios increase more rapidly in minerals with higher initial 87Rb/86Sr ratios. If the minerals' 87Sr/86Sr ratios as they exist now are plotted on a graph against their 87Rb/86Sr ratios, the data points form a straight line, called an isochron. The slope of the line is proportional to the time since the minerals formed, and the point where the line intercepts the 87Sr/86Sr axis (i.e., when 87Rb/86Sr is zero) gives the initial ratio when the minerals formed.

In this illustration, the minerals within a single rock are used to date it, and the line on the graph is called an internal isochron. The same principle can be applied if one uses numerous rocks that formed at the same time and place but which had different initial 87Rb/86Sr ratios. The result is called a whole-rock isochron. In practice, an isochron is ambiguous in that it dates the time either when the minerals or rocks formed or when they were last heated and the strontium isotopes in them rehomogenized. Consequently, other evidence about a rock or suite of rocks is needed to determine what the isochron is actually dating. If the data points for minerals or rocks do not fall on a line, it indicates that the system has been disturbed and cannot be used for dating. Shock is the most common cause of disturbed systems in meteorites.

In addition to the long-lived radio-nuclides, a number of short-lived radionuclides were present in the early solar system. Most of these have half-lives of only a few million years or less. They will have decayed away long ago and cannot be used to obtain absolute ages directly. However, their original abundances in some objects can still be determined by the isochron method. By comparing the original abundances of a short-lived radionuclide in different objects, scientists can determine their relative ages. If one or more of these objects also have had their absolute ages determined using long-lived radionu-clides, the relative ages can be converted into absolute ones. Trying to establish absolute ages for relative ages that have been determined from various short-lived radionuclides has been the focus of much modern research, but it has proved to be difficult. This is because the short-lived radionuclides typically behave chemically quite differently from one another and from the long-lived isotopes. Nevertheless, given the antiquity of meteorites, scientists have developed a remarkably accurate picture of the timing of events in the early solar system.

The oldest objects in meteorites, with ages of approximately 4,567,000,000 years, are refractory inclusions. With a few exceptions, these are also the objects with the highest abundances of shortlived radionuclides. The absolute ages of chondrules have not been accurately measured. The abundances of the shortlived radionuclide aluminum-26 in chondrules from ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites have been interpreted to indicate that they formed over an extended period from 1 million to at least 3 and perhaps as long as 10 million years after the refractory inclusions. There is some debate, however, over whether these ages, particularly the later ones, really date when chondrules formed or, rather, when their isotopes were reset by later processes. Metamorphism in the ordinary chondrites ended between 5 and 55 million years after refractory inclusions formed, and in enstatite chondrites between 9 and 34 million years after. This age span probably reflects both the size of the chondrite parent bodies and how deeply within their parent bodies the meteoritic materials were located. Larger bodies cool more slowly, as do more deeply buried regions of a body.

The formation ages of ordinary and enstatite chondrites are uncertain, but, given the age ranges established for the end of metamorphism, they can be no more than 5 and 9 million years after the formation of refractory inclusions, respectively. There is some evidence that enstatite chondrites formed about 2 million years after refractory inclusions. The formation ages of carbonaceous chon-drites are also not known, but dating of minerals produced during their alteration by liquid water indicates they must have formed within 3-7 million years, and possibly less than 1 million years, after the formation of refractory inclusions. The crystallization ages of achondrites from their magmas range from about 4,558,000,000 to roughly 4,399,000,000 years. There is some indication that the parent body of the HED meteorites started melting about 4,565,000,000 years ago. Iron and stony iron meteorites crystallized within 10-20 million years of refractory inclusions, while relatively recent evidence suggests that metal-silicate differentiation of their parent asteroids occurred less than 1.5 million years after the formation of refractory inclusions. This again demonstrates the rapidity with which many asteroids melted, differentiated, and solidified.

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