The Magnetic Field And Magnetosphere

Like the other giant planets, Uranus has a magnetic field that is generated by convection currents in an electrically conducting interior. The dipole field, which resembles the field of a small but intense bar magnet, has a strength of 0.23 gauss in its equatorial plane at a distance of one Uranian equatorial radius from the centre. The polarity of the field is oriented in the same direction as Earth's present field—i.e., an ordinary magnetic compass would point toward the counterclockwise rotation pole, which for Earth is the North Pole. The dipole axis is tilted with respect to the planet's rotation axis at an angle of 58.6°, which greatly exceeds that for Earth (11.5°), Jupiter (9.6°), and Saturn (less than 1°). The magnetic centre is displaced from the planet's centre by 31 percent of Uranus's radius (nearly 8,000 km [5,000 miles]). The displacement is mainly along the rotation axis toward the north pole.

The magnetic field is unusual not only because of its tilt and offset but also because of the relatively large size of its small-scale components. This "roughness" suggests that the field is generated at shallow depths within the planet, because small-scale components of a field die out rapidly above the electrically conducting region. Thus, the interior of

Uranus must become electrically conducting closer to the surface than on Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth. This inference is consistent with what is known about Uranus's internal composition, which must be mostly water, methane, and ammonia in order to match the average density of the planet. Water and ammonia dissociate into positive and negative ions—which are electrically conducting—at relatively low pressures and temperatures. As on Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth, the field is generated by fluid motions in the conducting layers, but on Uranus the layers are not as deep.

As is the case for the other planets that have magnetic fields, Uranus's field repels the solar wind, the stream of charged particles flowing outward from the Sun. The planetary magnetosphere— a huge region of space containing charged particles that are bound to the magnetic field—surrounds the planet and extends downwind from it. On the upwind side, facing the Sun, the magnetopause— the boundary between the magnetosphere and the solar wind—is 18 Uranian radii (460,000 km [286,000 miles]) from the centre of the planet.

The particles trapped within the Uranian magnetosphere comprise protons and electrons, which indicate that the planet's upper atmosphere is supplying most of the material. There is no evidence of helium, which might originate with the solar wind, or of heavier ions, which might come from the Uranian moons. Because the largest Uranian moons orbit within the magnetosphere, they absorb some of the trapped particles. The particles behave as if they were attached to the magnetic field lines, so that those lines intersecting a moon in its orbit have fewer trapped particles than neighbouring field lines.

As is the case for Jupiter and Saturn, charged particles from the Uranian magnetosphere impinge on the upper atmosphere and produce auroras. Auroral heating can just barely account for the high temperature of Uranus's exosphere.

0 0

Post a comment