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Contents

Dedication vii List of Contributors ix

1 Evolutionary Paleoecology: The Maturation of a Discipline Warren D. Allmon and David J. Bottjer 1

2 Scaling Is Everything: Brief Comments on Evolutionary Paleoecology

James W. Valentine 9

3 What's in a Name? Ecologic Entities and the Marine Paleoecologic Record

William Miller III 15

4 The Ecological Architecture of Major Events in the Phanerozoic History of Marine Invertebrate Life

David J. Bottjer, Mary L. Droser, Peter M. Sheehan, and George R. McGhee Jr. 35

5 Stability in Ecological and Paleoecological Systems: Variability at Both Short and Long Timescales Carol M. Tang 63

6 Applying Molecular Phylogeography to Test Paleoecological Hypotheses: A Case Study Involving Amblema plicata (Mollusca: Unionidae)

Bruce S. Lieberman 83

7 Nutrients and Evolution in the Marine Realm Warren D. Allmon and Robert M. Ross 105

8 The Role of Ecological Interactions in the Evolution ofNaticid Gastropods and Their Molluscan Prey

Patricia H. Kelley and Thor A. Hansen 149

9 Evolutionary Paleoecology of Caribbean Coral Reefs Richard B. Aronson and William F. Precht 171

10 Rates and Processes of Terrestrial Nutrient Cycling in the Paleozoic: The World Before Beetles, Termites, and Flies Anne Raymond, Paul Cutlip, and Merrill Sweet 235

11 Ecological Sorting of Vascular Plant Classes During the Paleozoic Evolutionary Radiation

William A. DiMichele, William E. Stein, and Richard M. Bateman 285

Author Index 337 Subject Index 349

Dedication j. john sepkoski jr. stands as one of the preeminent leaders of the late twentieth century in the ongoing effort to synthesize evolutionary paleobiology and paleoecology into the new discipline of evolutionary paleo-ecology. Many scientific disciplines, born recently, collect data with new technology at enormous rates. The avid practice of paleontology dates back to the nineteenth century, and given the nature of the materials, production of data is time-intensive because it is typically "hand-crafted" by paleontologists. Jack was one of the first paleontologists to recognize the treasure trove of data that existed in the paleontological literature of the past 150 years, which if extracted, could allow paleontologists sufficient quantities of data to allow statistical analysis and modeling of broad trends in the fossil record. And this is where Jack's great success lies. His legacy resides in such fundamental contributions as establishing the broad diversity trend of marine families in the Phanerozoic; the statistical analysis of mass extinctions and their timing, including recognition of the "Big 5"; delineation of the three Great Evolutionary Faunas of the Phanerozoic; and characterization of onshore-offshore trends. On his shoulders he lifted paleontology up, and much of what is evolutionary paleoecology today begins with his accomplishments.

Jack collaborated with many individuals to produce these achievements, and his name will always be linked with the highly productive association he had with Dave Raup. Many of us who worked with Jack were energized by his vision and creativity. Perhaps what was most impressive about this giant in our field was his humility and enormous generosity, particularly to the younger practitioners of paleontology. Jack mixed this all in with a great sense of humor, and evenings with him commonly combined conversations on paleontology with high adventure. In recent years his marriage to Christine Janis seemed the perfect match, and he talked with great excitement on their life together. His premature departure from our lives leaves both a personal and a professional void. His research interests and activities had never been greater, as reflected in his broad involvement with the production of this book. He read and made detailed comments on all the contributions and was preparing to write a final summary chapter when he died on May 1,1999. Jack Sepkoski set the stage for much of what we do, and it is to his memory that we dedicate this volume.

Contributors

Warren D. Allmon

Paleontological Research Institution 1259 Trumansburg Road Ithaca, NY 14850

Richard B. Aronson Dauphin Island Sea Lab

101 Bienville Boulevard, Dauphin Island, AL 36528 Department of Marine Sciences University of South Alabama Mobile, AL 36688

Richard M. Bateman The Natural History Museum Cromwell Road London SW7 5BD, UK

David J. Bottjer Department of Earth Sciences University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA 90089-0740

Paul Cutlip

Department of Geology and Geophysics Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843

William A. DiMichele Department of Paleobiology Smithsonian Institution Washington, DC 20560, USA

Mary L. Droser Department of Earth Sciences University of California Riverside, CA 92521

Thor A. Hansen Department of Geology Western Washington University Bellingham, WA 98225

Patricia H. Kelley Department of Earth Sciences University of Carolina at Wilmington Wilmington, NC 28403-3297

Bruce S. Lieberman Department of Geology University of Kansas 120 Lindley Hall Lawrence, KS 66045

George R. McGhee Jr. Department of Geological Sciences Rutgers University New Brunswick, NJ 08903

William Miller III Department of Geology Humboldt State University Arcata, CA 95521-8299

William F. Precht PBS & J

2001 Northwest 107th Avenue Miami, FL 33308

Anne Raymond

Department of Geology and Geophysics Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843

Robert M. Ross

Paleontological Research Institution 1259 Trumansburg Road Ithaca, NY 14850

Peter M. Sheehan Department of Geology Milwaukee Public Museum Milwaukee, WI 53233

William E. Stein Center for Paleobotany Binghamton University Binghamton, NY 13902

Merrill Sweet Department of Biology Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843

Carol M. Tang Department of Geology Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85287-1404

James W. Valentine

Museum of Paleontology and Department of

Integrative Biology University of California Berkeley, CA 94720

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